Tools

Power in knowledge not more firepower

I stood on Tragarete Road in Port of Spain on Sunday, a proud citizen, witnessing a truly magnificent Indepen­dence Day parade. I also stood, completely amazed, at the obvious overspending on military and paramilitary vehicles and wondered how much more of taxpayers’ dollars will be allocated to the Ministry of National Security in the upcoming budget.
We have the opening of the new school year and the Ministry of Education has been unable to find addition­al funding for the protection of teachers and pupils in “challenged” schools. Some school repairs even had to be put on hold. Perhaps the Ministry of National Security could have done without one or two of the armoured cars. Perhaps we could have been spared the cost of one fire truck and possibly saved on fancy transport vehicles for the army, in order to finance the concerns of the Minister of Education.
These new vehicles looked as if they were taken out of their boxes for public viewing at the Independence Parade. With wheels so clean and new that you could lick them, the impression given is these vehicles will all be reboxed until the imaginary war that we have with imaginary opponents commences.
The issue is we want to fight crime. The realisation must be it is the education
system that must play the most important role in edu-
ca­ting an impressionable age group. Rampant crime did not happen overnight or was it in a vacuum. With the correct attitudes and encouragement, and an equal playing field for all citizens, crime will eventually be controlled.
Knowledge is power, not guns or armoured vehicles.
Lynette Joseph
via e-mail
This content requires the latest Adobe Flash Player and a browser with JavaScript enabled. Click here for a free download of the latest Adobe Flash Player.

Express Poll

Do you think Trinidad and Tobago is overreacting to the Ebola threat?

  • Yes
  • No

Weather

More Weather