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Fuad gets a good cussing from activist

A silent protest outside the Prime Minister's office turned ugly yesterday when leader of the Highway Re-Route Movement, Dr Wayne Kublalsingh, hurled obscenities at Health Minister Dr Fuad Khan.

Khan, the only Government official to meet with the group since Kublalsingh began his hunger strike six days ago, was told to "get to f--- out of here" when he offered to leave an ambulance on standby for Kublalsingh.

Khan arrived just before 4 p.m and pulled a chair close to face Kublalsingh. He explained the dangers of starvation on the body, but Kublalsingh would have none of it.

"This is the response by your Government? I will not use that ambulance, I will not, not, not use that f------ ambulance so get the f--- out of here," Kublalsingh told Khan.

"Leave please. Leave now. Don't come and mamaguy us with ambulance. Why you mamaguying us with an ambulance? You are ill- treating our people and you want to come and mamaguy us with an ambulance? Get out of here," he said.

Kublalsingh told Khan if he wanted to offer help to anyone, save it for the people of Mon Desir and Debe.

"There are people there who are suffering trauma, exhaustion because its been years of long struggle. Their camp has been mashed up by the Government.

"They have sent guard dogs against us, they have bulldozed people's houses, they have come with laws that are very draconian and terrorise people emotionally, especially the older people, and they suffer from all kind of symptoms and our movement is physically exhausted, people are traumatised and I think that ought to be a concern of the Minister of Health," he said.

Khan did not respond to Kublalsingh's outburst other than to say no food and water could trigger that type of anger.

Khan said he had visited on his own accord, but had also spoken to the Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar, who gave instructions to leave the ambulance parked nearby.

He said he bore no malice for Kublalsingh, despite the outburst which he blamed on a lack of food and water.

"When one does not get enough water and the brain does not get enough water, you end up with mental confusion sometimes and you say and do things that you won't really say and do if you were not dehydrated, so that is what it is," he said.

—Renuka Singh

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