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Historian: Urgent counselling needed to stem the violence

Dr Jerome Teelucksingh,  St Augustine Campus historian and founder of International Men’s Day, says there was an urgent need to implement a “new socialisation” process for boys and girls, men and women, to stem the tide of domestic violence, murders and mayhem engulfing the society. 

On Saturday, Barry Karamath, 35, killed his children ten-month-old Omari Mayers, and his sister three-year-old Keanna Mayers by feeding them a  poisonous substance. 

Registered nurse Jaya Dubay-Ramrattan’s decomposing body was found in the trunk of her car at San Fernando General Hospital.

Shockwaves reverberated across T&T when Pennywise heiress Dian Paladee was murdered by her ex-husband Sanjeev Rambarran on January 10. 

In a a sad twist of fate, Avianna Karim’s sudden death prompted her husband Riaz Karim to drink poison. She was a Technical Education teacher at Parvati Girls’ Hindu College. 

Teelucksingh said: “I am saddened. I think the entire country is saddened to see these gruesome murders. It is even more sad to see innocent women and children being the victims.” 

Zeroing on the need for “a new socialisation process”, Teelucksingh said: “We need to introduce programmes for our primary and secondary schools boys and girls. They have to learn how to treat each other with respect and dignity. It is the only way we can win the gender war which is brewing. There needs to be a new socialisation process. There is  too much antagonism, bullying and  hate among boys and girls. The girls are vicious towards each other. I have seen girls fight. I can tell you is ‘all hell break loose’.” 

Teelucksingh said: “For too long, we have ignored helping our boys and men who need counselling. Every school should have a psychologist or a psychiatrist. A Dean of Discipline is not enough. I feel this is what the Ministry of Education should be highlighting because men are coming out of those schools with serious emotional and social problems.”

Teelucksingh said there was a need to stop the horning (dialect for infidelity) and tabanca (dialect for sorrow in a failed relationship).

He said: “Stop the infidelity.  Horning  has become endemic. It creates jealously and rage, sometimes leading to crimes of passion.”                       —ML

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