Thursday, April 27, 2017

Trini leads the world in accounting exam


La Horquetta resident Alayna Cloake says her home schooling reaped rich dividends as it helped her top the ACCA (Association of Certified Chartered Accountants) June 2013 examinations. 



Twenty-four-year-old Cloake visited Express House in Port of Spain on Tuesday with her father, Public Transport Service Corporation (PTSC) driver Peter Cloake.



She said he was “very proud” of her accomplishment.



 Her mother, Delores Winsbarrow, and elder siblings Abigail, 32, and Devon, 34, are also happy at her achievement. 



Cloake, a former pupil of St Joseph’s Convent, St Joseph, showed the Express a letter from ACCA director Alan Hatfield, which read: “I am delighted to inform you your performance in the ACCA June 2013 exams was outstanding and you achieved the highest mark worldwide for Paper 3—with a score of 93.”



Cloake was awarded a sum of money and certificate. 



“I am very elated and excited,” Cloake said. “I feel proud for my country. It was all about hard work and practice. I did it on my own. I did not go to accounting school. I never liked school very much. My time is mine. It is more flexible. I study at my own pace. I just bought the textbooks and paid for the exams. I wrote the exams and top-scored.



“I just went through the books and practised. Practice makes perfect. I did not go to any of the established accounting schools, I stayed home.”  



She said the programme of study consists of 14 papers with  Level 1 consisting  of  three papers, Level Two six and  Level Three five.



“I still have two optional papers to complete it. I will write them in December,” said  Cloake, who works as a full-time accountant at PTSC.  “I have always loved accounting. I have always loved figures, but accounting is not just about figures.” 



Cloake said she intends to establish her own business and assist other small businesses with their accounting, although she hasn’t yet decided on its nature. 



Asked what advice she wished to impart to young people, Cloake said: “Believe in yourself and pray and ask God to help you. He will make a way.”



Cloake, who also attended ASJA Girls’ College, Tunapuna, is gluten intolerant and her diet consists of mainly fruits and vegetables. 



“My ketchup is special. It’s about $70 a bottle. No meat and dairy products. Everything has gluten in it. I can’t go out and buy food like other people,” she said.



But she is not disheartened about her condition. 



“I encourage people to eat healthy. I am a Seventh-day Adventist. They emphasise healthy eating habits. Lots of granola.”



Apart from being selective about her eating habits, Cloake makes her own beauty and skin care products.



 “Gluten can get into my skin. Skin is the largest organ. I make my own shampoos, body powder and cream. For a cream, I might use coconut or olive oil and beeswax. I might use tea tree, rosemarie or lavender. I have fun...I’m like a chemist.”



 And now, she is eagerly anticipating a phone call indicating the date and time of the ACCA awards function.