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Records for Harley, Yorke in ASATT Invitational

 Tidal Wave Aquatics (TWA) Jahmia Harley broke three records while her teammate Kael Yorke smashed one when the Amateur Swimming Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ASATT) December Invitational continued on Friday night and yesterday morning.

And Pirates’s Luis-Sebastian Weekes broke an all comers record in the Boys 11-12 200 metres breaststroke (2:38.41), bettering Nicholas Bovell’s 1999 mark of 2:39.23.

At the Marlins Olympic-sized pool in Westmoorings on Friday, Harley wrote her name into the  records book in the Girls 9-10 100m freestyle, the only record on the night.

Harley sped up and down the pool in what turned out to be a race against time as she stopped the Omega timing system in 1:03.44 seconds.

Her time smashed the 1:04.73 mark set by Danielle Timothy back in 1994.

Alpha Sharks Ashley Weekes gained silver in 1:08.06 while Harley’s club mate Keona Yorke was third in 1:11.70.

Harley returned yesterday morning to register a new standard in the Girls 9-10 200m freestyle, clocking a 2:19.85. The time erased the 20-year old record T&T Atlanta Olympian Cerian Gibbes of 2:22.79.

Yorke interjected with another record-breaking effort in the Boys 11-12 800m freestyle when he went 9:31.78 for the 16-lap event. The old mark was held by former age-group standout Matthew Houllier in 9:34.53.

Harley returned at the end of the official programme yesterday to complete a time trial for the 50m butterfly event and splashed to a 32.58 second mark to erase Kimberlee John-Williams 32.72.

Harley won the actual Girls 9-10 50m butterfly event the previous night but not in record time (32.82).

Yorke won the Boys 11-12 100 m free (57.85) and the 50m fly (27.68) to add two more titles.

But the most wins by a swimmer went to Pirates’s Alexis Clarke of Barbados.

Clarke dominated the Girls 13-14, taking gold in the 100 free (1:03.71), 50m fly (31.96), 400m individual medley (5:40.60) and the 200m free (2:20.83).

Alpha Sharks Alex Sobers claimed three victories in the Boys 13-14-100m free (55.03), 50m fly (28.27), and 200m free (2:03.22).

Atlantis Aquatics Jada Chai was also a triple gold medallist in those last two sessions in the Girls 11-12, mounting the podium for the 100m free (1:02.73), 50m fly (31.29) and the 200m free (2:18.54). Weekes added the Boys 11-12 400 m IM (5:06.47) and 200 m free (2:11.71).

In the Girls 8 & under, Alpha’s Gaza Dunwoody and Marlins’s Zoe Anthony continued their competitive racing with Dunwoody getting the better of Anthony in both the 100m free (1:16.38 to 1:17.54)  and 50m fly (38.16 to 38.46).

There were similar tussles in the Boys 9-10 where Tidal Wave Aquatics (TWA) Aqeel Joseph, Wadadli’s Lleyton Martin and Alpha’s Nkosi Dunwoody traded races.

Joseph took the 50m fly (32.46), Martin the 100m free (1:06.40) and Dunwoody the 200 free (2:25.82).

Atlantis Aquatics Joshua Mc Leod claimed the Boys 15 & over 100m free 52.75 over Marlins’s Jabari Baptiste (53.13) and the 50m fly (24.83).

In the boys 8 & under Titans Josiah Changar sprinted to victory in 1:14.82.

Tariq Ashley, the Canada based swimmer who competed unattached, grabbed a couple of gold in the Boys 13-14 200m breaststroke (2:33.80) and 400m IM (4:54.12).

Aerios Aquatechs’s Vrisnelit Faure splashed to a pair of gold medals in the Girls 11-12 400m IM (5:47.78) and a shared title in the 200 m breaststroke with Black Sands’s Shne Joachim, both tied in 2:58.42.

TWA won two of the six relays and jumped to a commanding lead in their quest to win the overall title for the first time in the club’s history.

They are on 494.5 with hosts Marlins on 307 and last year’s champions Titans on 3:02.5.

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